5 SURVIVAL TIPS FOR YOUR MENOPAUSAL YEARS

Menstruation is common knowledge to everyone, especially to ladies who experience this natural body cycle at least monthly.

However, these “periodic visits” don’t last forever. Menstrual cycles stop temporarily during pregnancy. They punctuate most women’s lives for decades until they permanently stop. This phenomenon is known as “Menopause”. It is the body’s natural way of saying that your reproduction role is at rest permanently.

MENOPAUSE

Menopause is more than just hot flushes and total arrest of a woman’s period. A female’s body undergoes many other changes, including sleeping problems and several hormonal issues. Though these are a natural part of a woman’s life, they can still be uncomfortable too.

The menopausal years may not be something women look forward to, but it will happen sooner or later. Whether it’s you, your mother, sister, or friend, all ladies will eventually go through this transition. However, understanding the whole gamut of a period and menopausal issues can help you manage this concern and sail through this phase in stride.

THESE TIPS CAN MAKE YOU BID FAREWELL TO YOUR PERIOD AND SURVIVE ON YOUR MENOPAUSAL AND POSTMENOPAUSAL YEARS HEALTHILY AND HAPPILY:

  1. Exercise daily. It’s a no-brainer. Exercise is known for its many health benefits, like improving one’s mood, reducing stress, maintaining strength and balance, and enhancing the thermoregulatory mechanism. It also helps in shedding off those extra pounds which is necessary for decreasing your body warmth and reducing your risk of other diseases.
  2. Eat a proper diet. In addition to keeping an exercise routine, eating a balanced meal can help your body survive those raging hormonal changes. Strive to achieve your nutritional requirements and keep a healthy weight.
  3. Work on achieving a normal body temperature. When your body’s temperature regulating mechanism goes on haywire and hot flushes hit you, wear layered clothes and drink lots of fluid. Deep breathing exercises also help in regulating a normal body temperature.
  4. Monitoring any sign of bleeding or spotting. During menopause, your menstruation cycle is likely to become less frequent and will eventually come to a stop. While you’re going through the transition, you might experience heavy bleeding or light spotting. Keep track of these occurrences and have a record of it which you can bring with you every time you have a doctor’s appointment. With a reliable tally of your menopause symptoms, your doctor can give you a more accurate diagnosis, which consequently leads to the most fitting medical advice for your unique situation. This can help you correlate your symptoms, find a better coping mechanism, and make necessary lifestyle and/or medication changes.
  5. Have regular health screenings.Being proactive in your health care practices can ward off as many diseases as possible and improve your treatment plan. Commit to routine screenings, whether you are feeling healthy or not.However, it is also worth mentioning that not all health problems are caused by your menopause. That’s why it’s best to seek a medical expert’s advice whenever symptoms start to appear. Our team of healthcare practitioners at Alliance ObGyn & Consultants LLC are willing to work with you towards wellness. Get started with your healthcare plan and schedule a consultation today.

Ladies, embrace this new phase of your lives. If you have some coping mechanisms that are worth sharing, please feel free to tell the community in the comments. Don’t forget to share this post with someone you see fit!

Do you have additional concerns about menopause? Are your symptoms bothering you? Talk to our specialist today. Contact us at 856-320-5069.

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